Splinting vs. Corseting: What's the Best Way to Close Your Diastasis?

Splinting vs. Corseting: What's the Best Way to Close Your Diastasis?

diastasis-rehab-splint

Ever since the corset has been invented, the pressure has been on for a tiny waist. Many celebrities and public figures have snapped pictures of themselves ‘waist training,’ which involves the use of wearing a modernized corset while working out and in their everyday activities to obtain their ideal waist.

The desire for a smaller waist has been around for centuries, with the corset being a popular tool for achieving that ideal. However, wearing a corset for waist training will not help heal your diastasis recti. In this article, we'll explore the difference between corseting and casting with a splint, and why the latter is the better option for diastasis recti.

What is Corseting?

Corseting involves wearing a modernized corset while working out or going about your everyday activities to achieve a smaller waist. However, studies have shown that corseting can actually weaken the abdominal muscles, decrease circulation, and compress the organs. Corseting is not designed to heal a diastasis recti but to compress the muscles into a certain shape.

However, a corset will not help strengthen your abdominal muscles nor close your diastasis. In fact, many studies show that corseting or ‘waist training’ weakens the abdominal muscles, decreases circulation, and compresses the organs.

What is Splinting?

Splinting, on the other hand, involves using a splint to position both the abdominal muscles and the connective tissue in the right direction. When the abdominal muscles are separated with a large diastasis, they move sideways, stretching the connective tissue. The splint takes the stretch off the stretched-out connective tissue so that the connective tissue can heal, and the diastasis can begin to close. Wearing a splint all day long, except for 15 minutes a day to shower/bathe, helps keep the connective tissue continuously in a narrow position, allowing it to heal and the diastasis to close.

Our splint positions both the abdominal muscles and the connective tissue. The abdominal muscles need to be close together so they move in the right direction when doing the exercises. They need to move front to back. When they are separated with a large diastasis, they move sideways stretching the connective tissue.  Our splint takes the stretch off the “stretched out ” connective tissue so that the connective tissue can heal and the diastasis can begin to close. To be successful with our program means you must keep the connective tissue continuously in a narrow position by wearing the splint all day long, only taking it off for 15 minutes a day to shower/bathe.

The Difference Between Corseting and Casting

The "casting" method with a splint is designed to heal a person's diastasis. In contrast, corseting is designed to compress the muscles into a certain shape. Once the corset comes off, the muscles may be weak and unsupportive. In our program, the splint comes off when the connective tissue is healed, and the diastasis is closed and fully supported by stronger abdominal muscles.

The “casting” method, if you will, with our splint is designed to heal a person’s diastasis. Corseting or “waist training” is designed to compress the muscles to mold to a certain shape. But the moment the corset comes off, the muscles are often weak and unsupportive. The moment in our program when a splint comes off is when the connective tissue is healed. Then you’ll not only find your diastasis closed, but fully supported by stronger.

Conclusion:

Wearing a corset for waist training may not help heal your diastasis recti, but using a splint can strengthen and support your abdominal muscles for optimal healing. Avoid the negative impact of corseting and choose the casting method with a splint for the best results.

Back to blog

1 comment

Where can I get your product?

Deatra Lashley

Leave a comment